Saturday, 26 August 2017

12th August

Cleddon Bog- rarely seen micro


Never quite know what to expect when I get the opportunity to set up here at this site.
Not huge numbers of anything in particular that evening which is what I have come to expect with my actinic trap just quite a few species.
Lesser Swallow Prominent was quite prominent as Scalloped Hook-tip and a single Scarce Footman turned up but a few others caught my eye mainly because I had not encountered them before. Highlights for me were Dotted Clay, a beautiful Gold Spot, a Devon Carpet (which is a known site -Martin Anthony) and after fiddling around with close up photography a Stenolechia gemmella (Black-dotted Groundling).
Sam Bosanquet confirmed Stenolechia gemmella, informing me that this is only the second sighting made in the Vice county. The previous and only other sighting was by Sam 14 years ago in 2003.

Gold Spot

The night started quite promising with good cloud cover but this scattered quickly and opened up skies to bring the temperature down close to 12c with a damp dew forming on the trap and grasses by the time I packed up.
Devon Carpet (night photography)
Stenolechia gemmella (2nd ever sighting in V35)

A few owls hooted on the bird front but the best encounter was when a wildlife photographer and myself were chatting by the car at dusk about wildlife in general.
I'd already heard a Nightjar 'churring' in the locality beforehand but then one swooped down within 15 feet to inspect what was going on with the bright light. An amazing close encounter upon which he said that it could be attracted to the white sheet, or as I've just found out moths beetles and insects.
Would be interested to hear what any birders out there thought about this encounter?
I had this happened 2 years ago when two Nightjars swooped close to the trap close over the top of our heads. 

1 comment:

  1. Stenolechia is a good find. I am surprised there are so few records though, as it feeds on oak. I used to visit Cleddon Bog specifically to look for Nightjars when I was a keen county birder, and they came close occasionally. It would make sense that they were eating the moths at your trap, although I would have expected the light would scare them.

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